FAQ

Pollution

​Not according to a study by retired geologist Dr. Larry Jensen who served on the 2010 Technical Expert Panel for the State of the Aggregate Resource in Ontario Study. He conducted a review of aggregate reserves in Ontario and concluded that there was a 200 year supply in existing pits.nFor many reasons including the pollution and habitat destruction associated with aggregate mining there is a widespread movement underway to have the Aggregate Act of Ontario include a provision requiring that applicants “demonstrate need” for the aggregate. It is very unlikely that this application would meet such a requirement.

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​​It could become a bigger quarry if surrounding properties are bought up by the aggregate industry which commonly happens. It is very difficult to sell a property adjacent to a quarry unless it is sold well below market value. Other aggregate sites in the province have been identified for possible use in aggregate recycling operations and/or landfill.  These are possible future uses for the Hidden Quarry that may become the focus of future land use debate should applications for such uses be made. James Dick Construction Ltd. (JDCL) suggests that in 20 years or so the water-filled pits will continue to exist as lakes–Rockwood Conservation Area version 2 perhaps.

Categories: Pollution, Water
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​​Aggregate dust​ is one of the threats to nearby agricultural operations, including cash and forage crops, a mushroom farm, and others.  There is research that has shown that silica dust issuing from aggregate sites significantly reduces plant growth rates and coats crops like hay seriously affecting its value/use as fodder.  The possible contamination of downstream surface and groundwater is a second issue that may have consequences for agricultural operations.  Horse and livestock operations will also be affected by noise and vibration.  Horse trainers have spoken at CRC meetings about the risks involved when standard-bred horses are spooked by noise and vibration resulting from blasts.

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​​Definitely. There are risks of contamination of the surface water flowing through the site into the Byrdson Creek-Blue Springs Creek-Eramosa River systems–all part of the Grand River watershed–and similar contamination of the groundwater aquifer that feeds downstream wells,  There is real uncertainty about the extent to which blasting will impact the aquifer that feeds the Rockwood number 4 well.  In spite of assurances to the contrary, we believe that dust arising from crushing and loading operations as well as heavy truck traffic into and out of the site will be emitted as air pollution.

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​​It is located at the corner of Highway 7 and 6th Line Eramosa, just east of Rockwood and west of Acton. It is only one kilometre from the southern neighbourhoods of Rockwood as the crow flies, and as little as 165 m from homes and buildings on Eramosa 6th and 7th Lines and those at the north end of Nassagaweya 5th line! Nearly half the population of Rockwood lives within 2 kilometers of the site.

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